Anterior Abdominal Wall

ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL

Q. 1

Xiphoid process fuses to the body of sternum by?

 A 20 years
 B

30 years

 C 40 years
 D

50 years

Q. 1

Xiphoid process fuses to the body of sternum by?

 A 20 years
 B

30 years

 C 40 years
 D

50 years

Ans. C

Explanation:

40 years REF: Parikh 6th edition page 2.10

“Xiphoid process fuses to the body of sternum by 40 years” “Manubrium fuses to the body of sternum by 60 years”

FUSION OF EPIPHYSIS:

Region

Girls (years)

Boys (years)

Elbow

13-14

15-17

Wrist

16-17

18-19

Shoulder

17-18

19-20

Crest of ilium

18-19

20-21

Ischial tuberosity

21-22

23-24

Inner end of clavicle

21-22

23-24


Q. 2

True statement about lower 1/4th anterior abdominal wall

 A

Linea Alba is poorly formed

 B

Two layers of rectus sheath present

 C

External oblique poorly formed

 D

A and C

Q. 2

True statement about lower 1/4th anterior abdominal wall

 A

Linea Alba is poorly formed

 B

Two layers of rectus sheath present

 C

External oblique poorly formed

 D

A and C

Ans. D

Explanation:

A i.e. Linea alba is poorly formed; C i.e. External oblique is poorly formed

–  Rectus abdominis muscle is inserted along horizontal line passing laterally from the xiphoid process & cutting in that order the 7th 6th & 5th costal cartilage.

In lower 1/4th of anterior abdominal wall, linea alba is narrow and indistinctQ and external oblique muscle is poorly formed.


Q. 3

Which of the following does not predispose to abdominal wall dehiscence –

 A

Faulty technique

 B

Malignancy

 C

Raised intra abdominal pressure

 D

Old age

Q. 3

Which of the following does not predispose to abdominal wall dehiscence –

 A

Faulty technique

 B

Malignancy

 C

Raised intra abdominal pressure

 D

Old age

Ans. D

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘d’ i.e. Old age 


Q. 4

A new born presents with mid anterior abdominal wall defect with characteristic spontaneous disappearance at age of 4 years –

 A

Patent urachus

 B

Omphalocele

 C

Ectopia vesicae

 D

Umibilical hernia

Q. 4

A new born presents with mid anterior abdominal wall defect with characteristic spontaneous disappearance at age of 4 years –

 A

Patent urachus

 B

Omphalocele

 C

Ectopia vesicae

 D

Umibilical hernia

Ans. D

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘d’ i.e. Umbilical hernia 


Q. 5

Most common organ injured in penetrating injury of the abdomen:     

AFMC 10

 A

Liver

 B

Spleen

 C

Stomach

 D

Small intestine

Q. 5

Most common organ injured in penetrating injury of the abdomen:     

AFMC 10

 A

Liver

 B

Spleen

 C

Stomach

 D

Small intestine

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans. Liver


Q. 6

Identify the Muscle Marked as C in the Cross Section of the Abdominal Wall as shown in the diagram?


 A

Rectus Abdominis 

 B

Transverse Abdominis

 C

Extenal Oblique

 D

Internal Oblique

Q. 6

Identify the Muscle Marked as C in the Cross Section of the Abdominal Wall as shown in the diagram?


 A

Rectus Abdominis 

 B

Transverse Abdominis

 C

Extenal Oblique

 D

Internal Oblique

Ans. B

Explanation:


Q. 7

Thoracic duct enters from abdomen to thorax at ‑

 A

T6

 B

T10

 C

T12

 D

T8

Q. 7

Thoracic duct enters from abdomen to thorax at ‑

 A

T6

 B

T10

 C

T12

 D

T8

Ans. C

Explanation:

  • Thoracic duct is also called as Pecquet duct. It is the largest lymphatic duct in body, about 45 cm (18 inches) long. o It has a beaded appearance because of the presence of many valves in its lumen.
  • Thoracic duct begins as a continuation of the upper end of the cisterna chylinear the lower border of Tuvertebra and enters the thorax through the aortic opening of diaphragm (at T12 ).
  • It then ascends through the posterior mediastinum and at T5 level crosses from right side to the left side and ascends along left margin of oesophagus to enter the neck.
  • At the level of C7 vertebrae, arches towards left side to open into left brachiocephalic vein at the angle of union of left subclavian and left internal jugular veins.


Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this:
Malcare WordPress Security