Interaction Between Co2 & O2 Transport

INTERACTION BETWEEN CO2 & O2 TRANSPORT

Q. 1

Hamburger phenomenon deals with the following:

 A

Chloride shift

 B

Oxygen uptake

 C

Cellular ATP levels

 D

Plasma potassium level

Q. 1

Hamburger phenomenon deals with the following:

 A

Chloride shift

 B

Oxygen uptake

 C

Cellular ATP levels

 D

Plasma potassium level

Ans. A

Explanation:

Chloride shift (Hamburger phenomenon) the HCO3- diffuses out of the RBCs into the plasma, the inside of the cells become less negatively charged. Because the RBC membrane is relatively impermeable to cation, so in order to neutralize this effect, negatively charged chloride ions diffuse from the plasma into the RBCs to replace the HCO3-. The movement of chloride ions into the RBCs is called chloride shift or Hamburger phenomenon.  
 
Ref: Essentials of Medical Physiology By Khurana, 2008, Page 256.

Q. 2

Haldane effect is defined as:       

September 2010

 A

Important mechanism meant for oxygen transport in the body

 B

Binding of oxygen to hemoglobin increases capacity for carbon dioxide

 C

Deoxygenation of blood increases capacity for carbon dioxide

 D

All of the above

Q. 2

Haldane effect is defined as:       

September 2010

 A

Important mechanism meant for oxygen transport in the body

 B

Binding of oxygen to hemoglobin increases capacity for carbon dioxide

 C

Deoxygenation of blood increases capacity for carbon dioxide

 D

All of the above

Ans. C

Explanation:

Ans. C: Deoxygenation of blood increases capacity for carbon dioxide

The Haldane effect is a property of hemoglobin first described by the Scottish physician John Scott Haldane. Deoxygenation of the blood increases its ability to carry carbon dioxide; this property is the Haldane effect. Conversely, oxygenated blood has a reduced capacity for carbon dioxide.


Q. 3

Chloride shift is due to ‑

 A

Generation of HCO3 in RBCs

 B

Metabolism of glucose in RBCs

 C

Formation of O2-Hb complex in RBCs

 D

None

Q. 3

Chloride shift is due to ‑

 A

Generation of HCO3 in RBCs

 B

Metabolism of glucose in RBCs

 C

Formation of O2-Hb complex in RBCs

 D

None

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘a’ i.e., Generation of HCO3 in RBCs

  • Carbon dioxide is transported in blood as plasma bicarbonate.
  • Red blood cells (RBCs) play a major role in the mechanism because RBCs contain the enzyme carbonic anhydrase that catalyzes the reaction CO2 + H2O = HCO3 +
  • Hence when CO2 diffuses into the RBC, it reacts chemically with water to generate HCO3-.
  • The ft ions are mopped up by hemoglobin, which is an excellent buffer.
  • This enables the reaction to proceed in the forward direction.
  • The HCO3– ions generated diffuse out into the plasma in exchange for Cl- ions that diffuse into RBCs simultaneously.
  • The movement of chloride ions into RBC is called Chloride shift.
  • The above events results in an increase in total number ions inside the RBC, which increases its osmolarity.
  • As a result, water enters the RBC through osmosis.
  • The RBCs carrying CO2 in bicarbonate form will therefore be somewhat larger than normal.
  • Hence the hematocrit of venous blood is normally 3% greater than that of arterial blood. o In the lungs, Cl moves out of the RBCs and they shrink.


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