KLUMPKE’S PARALYSIS

KLUMPKE’S PARALYSIS

Q. 1

Klumpke’s paralysis from a brachial plexus injury involves which of the following nerve cords?

 A

C5, C6

 B

C6, C7

 C

C7, T1

 D

C8, T1

Q. 1

Klumpke’s paralysis from a brachial plexus injury involves which of the following nerve cords?

 A

C5, C6

 B

C6, C7

 C

C7, T1

 D

C8, T1

Ans. D

Explanation:

Klumpke’s paralysis is a form of paralysis involving the muscles of the forearm and hand, resulting from a brachial plexus injury in which the eighth cervical (C8) and first thoracic (T1) nerves are injured either before or after they have joined to form the lower trunk. 


Q. 2

Klumpke’s palsy is due to injury to the following nerves?

 A

Inferior trunk of the brachial plexus

 B

Superior trunk of the brachial plexus

 C

Subscapular nerve

 D

Ulnar nerve

Q. 2

Klumpke’s palsy is due to injury to the following nerves?

 A

Inferior trunk of the brachial plexus

 B

Superior trunk of the brachial plexus

 C

Subscapular nerve

 D

Ulnar nerve

Ans. A

Explanation:

The upper trunk (C5 and C6) is the most common area injured and results in the classic Erb palsy. Injury to the lower trunk (C7–T1) produces a Klumpke palsy. Klumpke palsy is characterized by good shoulder function but decreased or absent hand function. Brachial plexus injuries may also cause a Horner syndrome (unilateral miosis, ptosis, and facial anhidrosis) due to disruption of cervical sympathetic nerves.


Leave a Reply

Free Mini Course on Stomach

Mini Course – Stomach

22 High Yield Topics in Stomach

in Just 2 Hours

Submission received, thank you!

Close Window
%d bloggers like this:
Malcare WordPress Security