Verneal Keratoconjunctivitis (Spring Cattarrh)

VERNEAL KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS (SPRING CATTARRH)

Q. 1

Which among the following causes epidemic keratoconjunctivitis?

 A

HSV

 B

Adenovirus

 C

Chlamydia

 D

HIV

Q. 1

Which among the following causes epidemic keratoconjunctivitis?

 A

HSV

 B

Adenovirus

 C

Chlamydia

 D

HIV

Ans. B

Explanation:

Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) is a viral conjunctivitis caused by a group of adenoviruses. This family of adenoviruses contains different serotypes that can also cause pharyngoconjunctival fever and nonspecific follicular conjunctivitis.

 
It is one of the most common causes of acute conjunctivitis, with characteristic clinical features such as sudden onset of acute follicular conjunctivitis, with watery discharge, hyperemia, chemosis, and ipsilateral preauricular lymphadenopathy. 

Q. 2

Treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis includes all except:

 A

Steroids

 B

Chromoglycate

 C

Olopatadine

 D

Antibiotics

Q. 2

Treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis includes all except:

 A

Steroids

 B

Chromoglycate

 C

Olopatadine

 D

Antibiotics

Ans. D

Explanation:

Ans. Antibiotics


Q. 3

Features of vernal keratoconjunctivitis are:

 A

Papillary hypertrophy

 B

Shield’s ulcer

 C

Trantra’s spot

 D

All

Q. 3

Features of vernal keratoconjunctivitis are:

 A

Papillary hypertrophy

 B

Shield’s ulcer

 C

Trantra’s spot

 D

All

Ans. D

Explanation:

Ans.  A, B and C

Quiz In Between


Q. 4

Keratoconjunctivitis sicca refers to:

 A

Aqueous tear deficiency dry eye

 B

Mucin deficiency dry eye

 C

Lipid deficiency dry eye

 D

All types of dry eye

Q. 4

Keratoconjunctivitis sicca refers to:

 A

Aqueous tear deficiency dry eye

 B

Mucin deficiency dry eye

 C

Lipid deficiency dry eye

 D

All types of dry eye

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans. Aqueous tear deficiency dry eye


Q. 5

Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis is caused by:

March 2013 (a, d, g)

 A

Neisseria gonorrhoeae

 B

Adenovirus

 C

Corynebacterium diphtheriae

 D

Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Q. 5

Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis is caused by:

March 2013 (a, d, g)

 A

Neisseria gonorrhoeae

 B

Adenovirus

 C

Corynebacterium diphtheriae

 D

Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Ans. B

Explanation:

Ans. B i.e. Adenovirus

Conjunctivitis

  • Haemorrhagic conjunctivitis:
  • Enterovirus,
  • Adenovirus,
  • Coxsackie virus
  • Phylectenular conjunctivitis: TB
  • Giant papillary conjunctivitis: Contact lens
  • Angular conjunctivitis: Moraxella

Q. 6

Vernal keratoconjunctivitis is associated with ‑

 A

Corneal opacity

 B

Bacterial ulcer

 C

Spring season

 D

Glaucoma

Q. 6

Vernal keratoconjunctivitis is associated with ‑

 A

Corneal opacity

 B

Bacterial ulcer

 C

Spring season

 D

Glaucoma

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘a’ i.e., Corneal opacity

Vernal kerato conjunctivitis (spring cattarrh)

  • Spring cattarrh is an allergic inflammation of conjunctiva which is characterized by recurrent, bilateral, inter‑stitial, selflimiting conjunctivitis that becomes aggravated during spring and summer period.
  • It is considered to be Type I hypersensitivity reaction (immediate type) to exogenous allergens such as grass pollens.
  • It is more common in boys and affects age group 4-20 years.
  • More common in summer, hence the name spring catarrh looks a misnomer.
  • Recently it is being labeled as “Warm weather conjunctivitis”.

Clinical features of spring catarrh

  • Spring catarrh is characterized by marked itching & burning, Stringy (ropy) discharge, lacrimation, photo-phobia and heaviness of lids.
  • Clinically spring catarrh is divided into three types :
  1. Palpebral form : – It is the most common types. The upper palpebral conjunctiva shows papillae (papillary hypertrophy with their characteristic appearance : – i) Lage & flat toped, ii) Cobble stone appearance (Pavement stone appearance). These papilla heal without scarring.
  2. Bulbar form : – It is characterized by (i) Dusky red triangular congestion of bulbar conjunctiva in palpebral area; ii) Gelatinous thickened accumulation of tissue around the limbus; iii) Presence of discrete whitish raised dots along the limbus (Tranta’s spot).
  3. Mixed form : – Both bulbar and palpebral manifestations occur together.

Corneal signs (Vernal keratopathy)

  • Punctate epithelial keratitis
  • Ulcerative vernal keratitis : shallow transverse ulcer (Shield ulcer)
  • Vernal corneal plaques
  • Subepithelial scarring
  • Pseudogerontoxon: chracterized by a classical “cupid’s bow” outline.

Quiz In Between



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