Beta Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist / Beta-Blockers

Beta adrenergic receptor antagonists or beta-blockers

Q. 1 Beta blockers are contraindicated in?
 A Decompensated CCF
 B

Asthma

 C Atherosclerosis
 D

All of the above

Q. 1 Beta blockers are contraindicated in?
 A Decompensated CCF
 B

Asthma

 C Atherosclerosis
 D

All of the above

Ans. D

Explanation:

All of the above REF: KDT 6th ed p.139

CONTRAINDICATIONS OF BETA BLOCKERS:

  • Decompensated CCF
  • Bradycardia , HR< 60/min
  • COPD , Asthma
  • Variant angina
  • Carbohydrate intolerance
  • Hyperlipidemia
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Partial and complete heart block
  • Raynaud’s disease (95) 

Q. 2

Beta blockers are antiarrhythmic agents of type:

 A I
 B II
 C III
 D IV
Q. 2

Beta blockers are antiarrhythmic agents of type:

 A I
 B II
 C III
 D IV
Ans. B

Explanation:

II


Q. 3 Which of the following is not a cardioselective beta blocker:
 A Acebutol
 B Atenolol
 C Pindolol
 D Metoprolol
Q. 3 Which of the following is not a cardioselective beta blocker:
 A Acebutol
 B Atenolol
 C Pindolol
 D Metoprolol
Ans. C

Explanation:

Pindolol

Quiz In Between


Q. 4 Beta blockers are contraindicated in:
 A Angina
 B Hypertension
 C Asthma
 D Hyperthyroidism
Q. 4 Beta blockers are contraindicated in:
 A Angina
 B Hypertension
 C Asthma
 D Hyperthyroidism
Ans. C

Explanation:

Asthma


Q. 5

All of the following statements regarding pharmacokinetics of Beta blockers are TRUE, EXCEPT:

 A

Atenolol is longer acting than metoprolol

 B

Labetalol has both alpha and & beta blocking action

 C

Carvedilol has alpha1 agonist and selective b1 blocking action

 D

Nadolol has longest half life

Q. 5

All of the following statements regarding pharmacokinetics of Beta blockers are TRUE, EXCEPT:

 A

Atenolol is longer acting than metoprolol

 B

Labetalol has both alpha and & beta blocking action

 C

Carvedilol has alpha1 agonist and selective b1 blocking action

 D

Nadolol has longest half life

Ans. C

Explanation:

Carvedilol has approximately equal alpha blocking and and non selective beta blocking action. It reduces mortality in patients with heart failure and is therefore particularly useful in patients with both heart failure and hypertension.

Metoprolol and atenolol are are cardioselective beta blockers. Metoprolol has a short half life of 4-6 hrs whereas atenolol is not extensively metabolized and is excreted primarily in the urine with a half-life of 6 hours. 
Labetolol has both alpha and beta blocking properties so it is used in treating the hypertension of pheochromocytoma and hypertensive emergencies. 
Ref: Benowitz N.L. (2012). Chapter 11. Antihypertensive Agents. In B.G. Katzung, S.B. Masters, A.J. Trevor (Eds), Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 12e.

Q. 6

Which of the following Beta blocker is contraindicated in renal failure?

 A

Sotalol

 B

Pindolol

 C

Propranolol

 D

Oxyprenolol

Q. 6

Which of the following Beta blocker is contraindicated in renal failure?

 A

Sotalol

 B

Pindolol

 C

Propranolol

 D

Oxyprenolol

Ans. A

Explanation:

Sotalol is a non specific beta adrenergic receptor blocker.

It shortens the sinus cycle period, lengthens the atrial and ventricular refractory period and QT interval.

It has negative ionotropic effect and can reduce left ventricular contractile force and increase filling pressure.

It is excreted by the kidneys with an elimination half life of 10-15 hours, so it should be avoided in renal failure.

Ref: SCAI Interventional Cardiology Board Review Book By Morton J. Ker, Page 41; The Modern Role of Beta-Blockers in Cardiovascular Medicine By John Malcolm Cruickshank, Page 32; Medical Toxicology By Richard C. Dart, Page 685.

Quiz In Between


Q. 7

Which of the following is not a cardioselective beta blocker­

 A

Nebivolol

 B

Atenolol

 C

Betaxolol

 D

Oxprenolol

Q. 7

Which of the following is not a cardioselective beta blocker­

 A

Nebivolol

 B

Atenolol

 C

Betaxolol

 D

Oxprenolol

Ans. D

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘d’ i.e., Oxprenolol

Selective 131 blockers are (cardioselective) :

  1. Atenolol                  3. Bisoprolol                         5. Celiprolol          7. Metoprolol
  2. Acebutalol              4. Betoxolol                          6. Esmolol             8. Nebivolol

o These agents are preferred in DM, hyperlipidemia, PVD, asthma.


Q. 8

All of following are selective beta blockers, except

 A

Atenolol

 B

Esmolol

 C

Bisprolol

 D

Celiprolol

Q. 8

All of following are selective beta blockers, except

 A

Atenolol

 B

Esmolol

 C

Bisprolol

 D

Celiprolol

Ans. D

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘d’ i.e., Celiprolol


Q. 9

Beta blocker without local anaesthetic effect is

 A

Metoprolol

 B

Pindolol

 C

Atenolol

 D

All

Q. 9

Beta blocker without local anaesthetic effect is

 A

Metoprolol

 B

Pindolol

 C

Atenolol

 D

All

Ans. C

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘c’ i.e., Atenolol

β-blockers with membrane stabilizing (Local anaesthetic action

o Pindolol             o Acebutolol        o Carvedilol          o Betaxolol

o Propranolol        o Metoprolol         o Labetalol

Quiz In Between


Q. 10

All of the following are nonselective beta blockers with additional actions except –

 A

Carvedilol

 B

Betoxalol

 C

Carteolol

 D

Labetolol

Q. 10

All of the following are nonselective beta blockers with additional actions except –

 A

Carvedilol

 B

Betoxalol

 C

Carteolol

 D

Labetolol

Ans. B

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘b’ i.e., Betoxalol


Q. 11

Beta blocker that can be used in renal failure is all except-

 A

Propranolol

 B

Pindolol

 C

Sotalol

 D

Oxyprenolol

Q. 11

Beta blocker that can be used in renal failure is all except-

 A

Propranolol

 B

Pindolol

 C

Sotalol

 D

Oxyprenolol

Ans. C

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘c’ i.e., Sotalol

  • “Sotalol is not metabolized in liver, excretion is predominantly by the kidney in the unchanged form”. – Katzung 101Ve p. 229
  • Since it is primarly excreted in urine, it should not be used in renal failure.
  • 0-blockers which are primarily excreted by kidney and should not be given in renal failure –> Atenolol, Sotalol, nodolol

About other options

Approximately 50% of pindolol is metabolized in liver, the remainder of the drug is excreted unchanged in urine –  – Goodman Gillman

o Propranolol and oxprenolol are mainly metabolized in liver.


Q. 12

Beta blockers are contraindicated in ?

 A

Sick sinus syndrome

 B

Angina pectoris

 C

Acute aortic dissection

 D

Post MI

Q. 12

Beta blockers are contraindicated in ?

 A

Sick sinus syndrome

 B

Angina pectoris

 C

Acute aortic dissection

 D

Post MI

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘a’ i.e., Sick sinus syndrome

Quiz In Between


Q. 13

Beta blockers are contraindicated in?

 A

Decompensated CCF

 B

Asthma

 C

Atherosclerosis

 D

All of the above

Q. 13

Beta blockers are contraindicated in?

 A

Decompensated CCF

 B

Asthma

 C

Atherosclerosis

 D

All of the above

Ans. D

Explanation:

All of the above

o Asthma and decompensated heart failure are contraindications for the use of β -blockers.

o Atherosclerosis in peripheral vessels (Peripheral vascular disease) is not a contraindication for use of β -blockers. However, β -blockers can cause worsening of PVD, therefore, they should be avoided in PVD.


Q. 14

Beta blockers are not indicated in ‑

 A

Acute CHF

 B

Hypertension

 C

Chronic CHF

 D

Arrhythmia

Q. 14

Beta blockers are not indicated in ‑

 A

Acute CHF

 B

Hypertension

 C

Chronic CHF

 D

Arrhythmia

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘a’ i.e., Actue CHF

β -blckers are contraindicated in acute decompensated heart failure.


Q. 15

Combination use of beta blockers and calcium channel blockers cause –

 A

Heart block

 B

Hypertension

 C

Hypotension

 D

All

Q. 15

Combination use of beta blockers and calcium channel blockers cause –

 A

Heart block

 B

Hypertension

 C

Hypotension

 D

All

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘a’ i.e., Heart block

o CCBs (verapamil, diltiazem) have negative chronotropic effect (↓ SA node automaticity →↓ heart rate) and negative dromotropic effect (1AV node conduction).

o β-blockers have similar effect by blocking β1 sympathetic receptors on heart (normally stimulation of β1 receptors increases heart rate and conduction).

o Simultaneous use of these drugs can cause marked bradycardia and AV block.

Amongst CCBs, DHPs (nefidipine) can be used with β-blockers because DHPs have no direct negative chronotropic and dromotropic effect, rather they cause tachycardia by reflex sympathetic stimulation.

Quiz In Between


Q. 16

Drugs which interfere with anesthesia are :

 A

Calcium channel blocker nifedipine

 B

Beta blockers

 C

Aminoglycosides

 D

All

Q. 16

Drugs which interfere with anesthesia are :

 A

Calcium channel blocker nifedipine

 B

Beta blockers

 C

Aminoglycosides

 D

All

Ans. D

Explanation:

A i.e. Calcium channel blockers; B i.e. Beta Blockers; C i.e. Aminoglycoside

Aminoglycoside, Tetracycline & Polypeptide antibioticsQ (Mnemonic ATP) potentiate neuromuscular block

– B Blockers & Calcium channel blockerQ may cause Bradycardia & AV block with anesthesia


Q. 17

Contraindication of topical beta blockers

 A

Hypertension

 B

Asthma

 C

Tachycardia

 D

Hypotension

Q. 17

Contraindication of topical beta blockers

 A

Hypertension

 B

Asthma

 C

Tachycardia

 D

Hypotension

Ans. B

Explanation:

B i.e. Asthma


Q. 18

First line drug choice for management of hypertension in patients with angina:

 A

Beta Blockers

 B

ACE Inhibitors

 C

Calcium Channel Blockers

 D

Hydralazine

Q. 18

First line drug choice for management of hypertension in patients with angina:

 A

Beta Blockers

 B

ACE Inhibitors

 C

Calcium Channel Blockers

 D

Hydralazine

Ans. A

Explanation:

Answer is A (Beta Blockers)

‘Hypertension: A companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease (Elsevier) 2007/335

Beta-blockers are the first line drugs of choice for treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary artery disease & stable angina

`Beta blockers are the first line choice when treating hypertension in a patient with coronary artery disease’ — Evidence Based Medicine Guidelines (John Wiley & Sons)

‘Beta blockers reduce angina symptoms, improve mortality and lower BP, and they should be the drugs offirst choice in hypertensive patients with CAD and stable angina’ — ‘Hypertension: A companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease’

Quiz In Between


Q. 19

Beta blocker drug CONTRAINDICATED in asthma patients:           

September 2012

 A

Metoprolol

 B

Atenolol

 C

Propranolol

 D

Acebutolol

Q. 19

Beta blocker drug CONTRAINDICATED in asthma patients:           

September 2012

 A

Metoprolol

 B

Atenolol

 C

Propranolol

 D

Acebutolol

Ans. C

Explanation:

Ans. C i.e. Propranolol

Propranolol should be used with caution in people with:

  • DM or hyperthyroidism, since signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia may be masked.
  • PVD and Raynaud’s syndrome, which may be exacerbated
  • Phaeochromocytoma, as hypertension may be aggravated without prior alpha blocker therapy
  • Myasthenia gravis, may be worsened
  • Other drugs with bradycardic effects

Propranolol is contraindicated in patients with:

  • Reversible airways disease, particularly asthma or COPD
  • Bradycardia (
  • Sick sinus syndrome
  • AV block (second or third degree)
  • Shock
  • Severe hypotension
  • Cocaine toxicity
  • PVD/ Peripheral Vascular Disease

Q. 20

Effect of beta blocker’s on heart are all of the following except: 

 A

Decrease in heart rate

 B

Decreases duration of systole

 C

Decreases cardiac output

 D

Precipitates heart failure

Q. 20

Effect of beta blocker’s on heart are all of the following except: 

 A

Decrease in heart rate

 B

Decreases duration of systole

 C

Decreases cardiac output

 D

Precipitates heart failure

Ans. B

Explanation:

Ans. B: Decreases duration of systole

In the presence of increased sympathetic tone, beta blocker reduces the automaticity and prevents rise in heart rate; reduces myocardial contractility, cardiac output and stroke work; slows AV conduction, reduces myocardial oxygen demand and improves exercise tolerance

  • Beta blockers/Beta-adrenergic blocking agents/Beta-adrenergic antagonists/Beta-adrenoreceptor antagonists/Beta antagonists
  • They are particularly for the management of cardiac arrhythmias, cardioprotection after myocardial infarction, and hypertension.
  • As beta adrenergic receptor antagonists, they diminish the effects of epinephrine (adrenaline) and other stress hormones.
  • Beta blockers block the action of endogenous catecholamines epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) in particular, on beta-adrenergic receptors, part of the sympathetic nervous system which mediates the “fight or flight” response.
  • There are three known types of beta receptor, designated beta-1, beta-2 and beta-3 receptors.
  • Beta-1-adrenergic receptors are located mainly in the heart and in the kidneys.
  • Beta-2-adrenergic receptors are located mainly in the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, liver, uterus, vascular smooth muscle, and skeletal muscle.
  • Beta-3-adrenergic receptors are located in fat cellsStimulation of beta-1 receptors by epinephrine induces a positive chronotropic and inotropic effect on the heart and increases cardiac conduction velocity and automaticity.Stimulation of beta-1 receptors on the kidney causes renin release.Stimulation of beta-2 receptors induces smooth muscle relaxation, induces tremor in skeletal muscle, and increases glycogenolysis in the liver and skeletal muscle.
  • Stimulation of beta-3 receptors induces lipolysis.
  • Beta blockers inhibit these normal epinephrine-mediated sympathetic actions, but have minimal effect on resting subjects.That is, they reduce excitement/physical exertion on heart rate and force of contraction, and also tremor and breakdown of glycogen, but increase dilation of blood vessels and constriction of bronchi.It is therefore expected that non-selective beta blockers have an antihypertensive effect.Antianginal effects result from negative chronotropic and inotropic effects, which decrease cardiac workload and oxygen demand.
  • Negative chronotropic properties of beta blockers allow the lifesaving property of heart rate control.
  • The antiarrhythmic effects of beta blockers arise from sympathetic nervous system blockade – resulting in depression of sinus node function and atrioventricular node conduction, and prolonged atrial refractory periods.
  • Sotalol, in particular, has additional antiarrhythmic properties and prolongs action potential duration through potassium channel blockade.Blockade of the sympathetic nervous system on renin release leads to reduced aldosterone via the renin angiotensin aldosterone system with a resultant decrease in blood pressure due to decreased sodium and water retention
  • Referred to as intrinsic sympathomimetic effect, this term is used particularly with beta blockers that can show both agonism and antagonism at a given beta receptor, depending on the concentration of the agent (beta blocker) and the concentration of the antagonized agent (usually an endogenous compound such as norepinephrine).
  • Some beta blockers (e.g. oxprenolol, pindolol, penbutolol and acebutolol) exhibit intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA).
  • These agents are capable of exerting low level agonist activity at the beta-adrenergic receptor while simultaneously acting as a receptor site antagonist.
  • These agents, therefore, may be useful in individuals exhibiting excessive bradycardia with sustained beta blocker therapy.Agents with ISA (intrinsic sympathomimetic acitivity) are not used in post-myocardial infarction as they have not been demonstrated to be beneficial.
  • They may also be less effective than other beta blockers in the management of angina and tachyarrhythmia
  • Some beta blockers (e.g. labetalol and carvedilol) exhibit mixed antagonism of both beta- and alpha-1-adrenergic receptors, which provides additional arteriolar vasodilating actionThey can also be used to treat glaucoma because they decrease intraocular pressure by lowering aqueous humor secretion.

Non-selective agents

  • Alprenolol
  • Bucindolol
  • Carteolol
  • Carvedilol (has additional a-blocking activity)
  • Labetalol (has additional a-blocking activity)
  • Nadolol
  • Oxprenolol
  • Penbutolol (has intrinsic sympathomimetic activity)
  • Pindolol (has intrinsic sympathomimetic activity)
  • Propranolol              
  • Timolol
  • Beta-I-Selective agents

Acebutolol (has intrinsic sympathomimetic activity)

  • Atenolol
  • Betaxolol
  • Bisoprolol
  • Celiprolol

Esmolol

  • Metoprolol
  • Nebivolol
  • Beta-2-Selective agents
  • Butaxamine (weak alpha-adrenergic agonist activity) – No common clinical applications.
  • Pharmacological differences

Agents with intrinsic sympathomimetic action (ISA)

  • Acebutolol, carteolol, celiprolol, mepindolol, oxprenolol, pindolol, labetalol.

Agents with greater aqueous solubility (hydrophilic beta blockers)

  • Atenolol, celiprolol, nadolol, sotalol

Agents with membrane stabilizing effect

  • Acebutolol, betaxolol, pindolol, propranolol

Agents with antioxidant effect

  • Carvedilol, nebivolol
  • Indication differences

Agents specifically indicated for cardiac arrhythmia

  • Esmolol, sotalol, landiolol

Agents specifically indicated for congestive heart failure

  • Bisoprolol, carvedilol, sustained-release metoprolol, nebivolol

Agents specifically indicated for glaucoma

  • Betaxolol, carteolol, levobunolol, metipranolol, timolol

Agents specifically indicated for myocardial infarction

  • Atenolol, metoprolol, propranolol

Agents specifically indicated for migraine prophylaxis

  • Timolol, propranolol
  • Propranolol is the only agent indicated for control of tremor, portal hypertension, and esophageal variceal bleeding, and used in conjunction with alpha-blocker therapy in phaeochromocytoma
  • Indications for beta blockers include:

Angina pectoris

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Cardiac arrhythmia
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Essential tremor
  • Glaucoma
  • Hypertension
  • Migraine prophylaxis
  • Mitral valve prolapse

Myocardial infarction

Phaeochromocytoma, in conjunction with alpha-blocker

  • Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome
  • Symptomatic control (tachycardia, tremor) in anxiety and hyperthyroidism
  • Acute aortic dissection
  • Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy
  • Marfan syndrome (treatment with propranolol slows progression of aortic dilation and its complications)
  • Prevention of variceal bleeding in portal hypertension
  • Social anxiety disorder and other anxiety disorders

Q. 21

First line drug for primary open angle glaucoma is:

March 2012

 A

Pilocarpine

 B

Dorzolamide

 C

Dipivefrine

 D

Beta blockers

Q. 21

First line drug for primary open angle glaucoma is:

March 2012

 A

Pilocarpine

 B

Dorzolamide

 C

Dipivefrine

 D

Beta blockers

Ans. D

Explanation:

Ans: D i.e. Beta blockers

Drugs for primary open angle glaucoma

  • Adjunctive drugs for primary open angle glaucoma are dipivefrine, dorzolamide & pilocarpine
  • First line drugs for primary open angle glaucoma includes beta blockers, brimonidine & prostaglandin analogues

Quiz In Between


Q. 22

Beta blocker with membrane stabilizing property are all except ‑

 A

Acebutolol

 B

Betaxolol

 C

Carvedilol

 D

Bevantolol

Q. 22

Beta blocker with membrane stabilizing property are all except ‑

 A

Acebutolol

 B

Betaxolol

 C

Carvedilol

 D

Bevantolol

Ans. D

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘d’ i.e., Bevantolol


Q. 23

Shorest acting beta blocker ‑

 A

Esmolol

 B

Nodalol

 C

Acebutolol

 D

Sotalol

Q. 23

Shorest acting beta blocker ‑

 A

Esmolol

 B

Nodalol

 C

Acebutolol

 D

Sotalol

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘a’ i.e., Esmolol

Nodalol is longest acting β-blocker.

Esmolol is shortest acting β-blocker.

Acebutolol possesses all activities i.e., cardioselectivity, partial agonist activity, membrane stablizing activity and lipid insolubility.


Q. 24

Patient on verapamil should not be given beta blocker as ‑

 A

Conduction block

 B

Bronchospasm

 C

Neurogenic shock

 D

Anaphylaxis

Q. 24

Patient on verapamil should not be given beta blocker as ‑

 A

Conduction block

 B

Bronchospasm

 C

Neurogenic shock

 D

Anaphylaxis

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘a’ i.e., Conduction block

Adverse effects of CCBs

  • Nausea, constipation and bradycardia are more common with verapamil.
  • Verapamil can accentuate conduction defect-should be avoided in 2nd & 3rd degree block, in sick sinus syndrome and along with 13-blocker.
  • Most common side effects of DHPs are palpitation, flushing, hypotension, headache, ankle edema, drowsiness and nausea.
  • Nifedipine can paradoxically increase the frequency of angina in some patients.
  • Nifedine can cause voiding difficulty in elderly (relaxant effect on bladder) and glucose intolerance (decreases insulin release).

Quiz In Between


Q. 25

Mechanism of action of timolol is ‑

 A

Nonselective beta blocker

 B

Nonselective alpha blocker

 C

Selective beta 1 blocker

 D

Selective beta 2 blocker

Q. 25

Mechanism of action of timolol is ‑

 A

Nonselective beta blocker

 B

Nonselective alpha blocker

 C

Selective beta 1 blocker

 D

Selective beta 2 blocker

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘a i.e., Nonselective beta blocker

Timolol is a non selective beta blocker (betal + beta 2).

Thus when it is used in the treatment of glaucoma it can precipitate an attack of asthma by blocking beta 2 receptors.


Q. 26

Beta blockers mask all effects of hypoglycemia except ‑

 A

Sweating

 B

Palpitations

 C

Dizziness

 D

Tremors

Q. 26

Beta blockers mask all effects of hypoglycemia except ‑

 A

Sweating

 B

Palpitations

 C

Dizziness

 D

Tremors

Ans. C

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘c’ i.e., Dizziness

Symptoms of hypoglycemia are attributable to :-

i) Sympathetic stimulation : Sweating, tremor, tachycardia palpitations and anxiety. These are the warning signs.

ii) Cerebral glucose deficiency : Decreased cognitive functions, dizziness and decreased concentration.

  • Use of beta-blockers, especially in diabetics who are taking treatment, may mask typical sympathetic system mediated symptoms of hypoglycemia such as sweating, tremor, tachycardia, and palpitations.
  • Thus, dangerous severe hypoglycemia can occur without any warning signs.

Q. 27

Tachycardia due to nitrates in a patient with angina pectoris is blocked by‑

 A

Digoxin

 B

Dobutamine

 C

Beta blocker

 D

Calcium channel blocker

Q. 27

Tachycardia due to nitrates in a patient with angina pectoris is blocked by‑

 A

Digoxin

 B

Dobutamine

 C

Beta blocker

 D

Calcium channel blocker

Ans. C

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘c’ i.e., Beta blocker

Use of beta blocker and long acting nitrate combination is rational in classical angina because :

  1. Tachycardia due to nitrate is blocked by beta blocker
  2. The tendency of beta blocker to cause ventricular dilatation is countered by nitrate
  3. The tendency of beta blocker to reduce the total coronary flow is opposed by nitrate

Quiz In Between


Q. 28

Which of the following is not a cardioselective beta blocker?

 A

Esmolol

 B

Nebivolol

 C

Acebutolol

 D

Oxprenolol

Q. 28

Which of the following is not a cardioselective beta blocker?

 A

Esmolol

 B

Nebivolol

 C

Acebutolol

 D

Oxprenolol

Ans. D

Explanation:

Ans. is d i.e., Oxprenolol


Q. 29

Following features are true about lipid insoluble beta blockers except‑

 A

Do not cross blood brain barrier

 B

Have good membrane stabilizing effect

 C

Incompletely absorbed orally

 D

Are long acting

Q. 29

Following features are true about lipid insoluble beta blockers except‑

 A

Do not cross blood brain barrier

 B

Have good membrane stabilizing effect

 C

Incompletely absorbed orally

 D

Are long acting

Ans. B

Explanation:

Ans. is `b i.e., Have good membrane stabilizing effect

Lipid insolubile drugs have following features

  • Do not cross Blood Brain Barrier and therefore produce no CNS effects.
  • Have good renal excretion
  • Have no membrane stabilizing activity
  • Are incompletely absorbed orally
  • Are long acting
  • Are effective in narrow dose range

Lipid insoluble β-blockers

  1. Acebutolol
  2. Betoxalol
  3. Atenolol
  4. Carteolol
  5. Bisoprolol
  6. Celiprolol
  7. Esmolol
  8. Nodalol
  9. Sotalo
  10. Labealol
  11. Pindolol

Q. 30

Which of the following is not a cardioselective beta blocker ‑

 A

Nebivolol

 B

Atenolol

 C

Betaxolol

 D

Oxprenolol

Q. 30

Which of the following is not a cardioselective beta blocker ‑

 A

Nebivolol

 B

Atenolol

 C

Betaxolol

 D

Oxprenolol

Ans. D

Explanation:

Ans. is ‘d’ i.e., Oxprenolol 

Quiz In Between



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