Mondor Disease

Mondor Disease

Q. 1 Mondor’s disease of breast is a variant of:

 A

Mycotic infection

 B

Malignancy

 C

Thrombophlebitis

 D

Lymphadenitis

Q. 1

Mondor’s disease of breast is a variant of:

 A

Mycotic infection

 B

Malignancy

 C

Thrombophlebitis

 D

Lymphadenitis

Ans. C

Explanation:

Mondor’s disease is a variant of thrombophlebitis that involves the superficial veins of the anterior chest wall and breast.

In 1939, Mondor described the condition as “string phlebitis,” a thrombosed vein presenting as a tender, cord-like structure.

Frequently involved veins include the lateral thoracic vein, the thoracoepigastric vein, and, less commonly, the superficial epigastric vein.

Typically, a woman presents with acute pain in the lateral aspect of the breast or the anterior chest wall.


A tender, firm cord is found to follow the distribution of one of the major superficial veins 
 
Ref: Schwartz’s principle of surgery 9th edition, chapter 17.

Q. 2

Mondor’s disease is ‑

 A

Thrombophlebitis of the Superficial veins of Breast

 B

Carcinoma of the breast

 C

Premalignant condition of the breast

 D

Filariasis of the breast

Q. 2

Mondor’s disease is ‑

 A

Thrombophlebitis of the Superficial veins of Breast

 B

Carcinoma of the breast

 C

Premalignant condition of the breast

 D

Filariasis of the breast

Ans. A

Explanation:

Ans is ‘a’ i.e., Thrombophlebitis of Superficial veins of Breast

  • Mondor’s disease
  • is thrombophlebitis of the superficial veins of anterior chest wall and breast although it has also been seen in the arm.
  • frequently involved veins are lateral thoracic vein, thoracoepigastric vein and superficial epigastric veins.
  • aetiology is unknown
  • also known as ‘string phlebitis’, it presents as a tender cord-like structure.
  • The women may present with acute pain in the lateral asepct of breast or the anterior chest wall. A tender cord-like superficial thrombosed vein is formed and when the skin over the breast is stretched by raising the arm, a narrow shallow subcutaneous groove alongside the cord becomes apparent.
  • rarely it may be bilateral.
  • Management

it’s a benign self-limited disorder
The differential diagnosis is lymphatic permeation from an occult carcinoma of breast
When the diagnosis is uncertain or a mass is present near the cord, a biopsy may be done. Treatment

  • antiinflammatory drugs and warm compresses
  • restricted arm movements as well as brassiere support of breast
  • it usually resolves within 4 to 6 weeks. When symptoms persists or are refractory to treatment, the involved vein segment may be excised.

Q. 3 About Mondor’s disease –

 A

Superficial thrombophlebitis

 B

Lymphatic infiltration tumour cell

 C

Cord like apperance of subcutanous veins

 D

a and c

Q. 3

About Mondor’s disease –

 A

Superficial thrombophlebitis

 B

Lymphatic infiltration tumour cell

 C

Cord like apperance of subcutanous veins

 D

a and c

Ans. D

Explanation:

Answer (a) Superficial thrombophlebitis; (c) Cord like apperance of sub. cut. veins 

  • In Mondor’s disease the thrombophlebitis is mostly limited to areas around the breast and there is no evidence of thrombophlebitis in other parts of body.
  • Lymphatic infiltration from tumor cells is a differential diagnosis of Mondor’s disease.

Quiz In Between



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